Sydney Tower

Whether you love it or you hate it, it is undeniable that the Sydney Tower is an often used symbol of the growing Sydney metropolis and a draw for sightseeing tourists the world over. It has been described by some as modern, progressive and chic; by others as gaudy, grandiose, and unoriginal, but there is one thing that everyone can agree on: it is tall.

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Richmond Bridge

Even though it gives the impression of a modest stone bridge in a quiet rural setting, the Richmond Bridge is anything but ordinary. Built by convict labour to facilitate crossing of the Coal River, the bridge played an important role in early Tasmanian agricultural development and in the rapid growth of the Richmond area. Surviving as Australia’s oldest functional bridge, it is now a notable symbol of Tasmanian heritage, a popular attraction for tourists, photographers, and artists, and a lasting expression of Australia’s convict past.

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Eureka Tower

The Eureka Tower dominates the Melbourne skyline as a shining example of engineering and architectural ingenuity. In order to create one of the tallest residential buildings of its time, numerous organisations had to come together to overcome the multifaceted challenges of constructing a super high-rise of this magnitude. Through an integrated approach, Grocon Constructors, Fender Katsalidis architects, and their many teams conquered difficult geology, high wind speeds, and other complex design considerations to develop a strong, sleek, and unprecedented Australian landmark.

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Mudgee Post Office

Mudgee Post Office was among a total of forty-three post offices from across Australia which were just last month added to the Commonwealth Heritage List. Included in this list were such historically significant post offices as Albury Post Office, built in 1880 as a strategic connection between Melbourne and Sydney; Camperdown Post Office, constructed in 1863 and one of Victoria’s oldest post offices to incorporate telegraph facilities; and South Perth Post Office, which was one of the first WA post offices constructed following federation of the Commonwealth in 1901.

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The Australian War Memorial

This year marks the seventieth anniversary for the Australian War Memorial, which was first commissioned by Charles Bean back in 1923, and was later opened on November 11th, 1941. The Memorial is one of Australia’s most historically significant tourist attractions, existing as a centre for education and research and as a commemoration of the sacrifice of all Australians who have given their lives in war. The Memorial, which also includes multi-million dollar world class exhibitions and galleries, an extensive collection of art, relics, photographs, film, and sound, saw more than 832,000 visitors last year and had 3.11 million visits to its website.

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Swan Bells

Perth’s downtown core, although a short distance from the Swan River, was once isolated, both physically and mentally, from this natural beauty. For years the City of Perth has planned and worked to bridge the gap between its centre of commerce and the potential centre of community found at the waterfront. This important project began more than a decade ago with the construction of the iconic Bell Tower at the heart of the Barrack Square Redevelopment. Sometimes referred to as Swan Bells, this tower houses the historic St Martin in the Fields bells, but also serves as a modern WA landmark and a symbol for Perth, drawing crowds to learn, relax, and socialise on the banks of the Swan River.

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Werribee Park Mansion

From the humble beginnings of immigrant settlers emerged a 19th century pastoral empire, and the epicentre of the early Wyndham District. This centre of activity was a large estate called Werribee Park which rests on the fertile shores of Werribee River. At the heart of the park is a large mansion now preserved to represent the lives of European settlers in the region, and to showcase the success of the first owners of the estate, the Chirnsides.

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New Parliament House

An enormous flag waving in the breeze atop a building on Capital Hill has become a well known Australian icon. This building, blending into the landscape, striking without being domineering, is Australia’s Parliament House. As a replacement for Old Parliament House, this house on a hill has been designed to last, inside and out, as a functional space for governmental workings and as a symbol of the democratic process.

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Paddington Reservoir Gardens

Every issue, Australian Construction Focus profiles a structure of unique historical, cultural, or environmental significance. This month, we take a closer look at Paddington Reservoir Gardens, Sydney, NSW.

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Fremantle Prison

The first fleet of convicts set sail from Britain in 1787 to establish the earliest penal colony in Australia. From that moment, British convict transportation significantly impacted Australian colonial development, until the last shipment of prisoners landed at Fremantle in January, 1868. During this period, more than 160,000 prisoners were sent from Britain to Australia; of these, nearly 10,000 completed their sentences behind the bars of Fremantle prison.

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Home Automation

Call it ‘domotics,’ and you are likely to receive a blank stare, but refer to it as ‘smart home’ or ‘home automation,’ and you will get a nod of acknowledgement. For the past few years, consumers have heard the word ‘smart’ attached to countless products and services, from food and drink to snacks like popcorn and mobile phones, which no one seems to refer to as a ‘cellphone’ anymore. Yet what, exactly, constitutes ‘smart’?

January 17, 2019, 5:59 AM AEDT